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It's a difficult time to think about anything, but most pet owners will be faced with a decision to make at the end of their pets life 

Home burial

For smaller pets some owners choose to take their pets home with them and find a suitable burial place in the garden. This obviously isn't always a suitable choice as many modern homes don't have suitable garden areas and many of us rent nowadays so this isn't recommended.

Before choosing to take your pet home it's a good idea to check with your local council environmental health department to ensure this is allowed (generally most local authorities will allow this.)

If you do choose to take your pet home with you, be aware that the drugs used to put an animal to sleep can be dangerous for the wildlife in your garden. Unfortunately foxes, rats and even cats may try to dig up your pet's grave and if ingested this could prove fatal so ensure that the hole is deep to deter them from digging.

Avoid burying pets too close to the house and near water supplies.

Cremation

Owners who choose not to take their pet home may wish to have them cremated and with this service may choose to have their ashes returned to them or not. We work closely with Limekiln Farm, based in Gloucester they offer pet cremation services and have been used by the practice for many years now. We have build a great relationship with us during this time, members of the team have visited their facilities and met the staff there; so you can rest assured that your pet will be treated with respect at all times.

 

Communal Cremation

If you do not wish to have your pet's ashes returned to you, a communal cremation is the right choice as your pet's ashes will be scattered after a communal cremation is completed.

Individual Cremation

Image result for wooden pet casketMany pet owners want to keep their pet at home without the burial, so an individual cremation is the best choice. Your pet will be cremated on their own and their ashes collected and stored in a wooden casket. The ashes will be hand delivered to the practice and can be collected from your vets.

This is a nice option for people who aren't sure what to do with their pet's remains as the compact caskets offer many different options.

Burying the Ashes

If space in the garden is difficult, burying a casket may be a more suitable solution for those owners who are short on space. This is also a good option for those with lots of wildlife in the garden as the ashes and wooden casket won't be appealing to scavenging animals.

Planting a Tree/Plant

If you are likely to move and can't bear the thought of leaving your pet behind, buring the ashes in a tub/pot means that they can be taken with you wherever you go. Many people like to plant roses or other flowering plants, so that they can enjoy the beautiful reminder of their pet each time they flower.

Some people mix the ashes directly into the soil, or choose to bury the entire casket (it's your choice, there's no right or wrong way to make a memorial)

Memorial Plaques

If you're burying the ashes (or your pet's remains) you may wish to mark the area that they are buried and a memorial plaque is a great way to do this. There are so many options and companies offering different services, here's some ideas.

Jewellery

Image result for ashes to glassA recent trend has been to have ashes made into glass jewellery, what better way to keep your pet close to you at all times. There are many companies offering such services so we'd suggest looking on the internet for options and prices.

 

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